Thursday, 28 August 2014

Protesters target Ashton Jobcentre for sanctioning pregnant girl!

















A two-day protest against benefit sanctions took place outside Ashton-under-Lyne Jobcentre on Wednesday and Thursday of last week. The demonstration was called after a 19-year-old girl from the Tameside area was sanctioned after telling her placement provider B&Q, that she was 23-weeks pregnant.

By all accounts, the DIY firm had offered her a placement working unpaid and had said that her pregnancy was not a problem as they would give her light duty work to undertake. She then discovered  that they had changed tack and contacted the Jobcentre in Ashton-under-Lyne to say they didn't require her services because she was pregnant. The Jobcentre then told she was being sanctioned because she should not have declared her pregnancy.

Having first claimed claim Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) three months ago, this was her third sanction by Ashton-under-Lyne Jobcentre. On the first two occasions, she was told that she was not doing enough to find work although she was looking and applying for work.

Although the Department of Work & Pensions (DWP), deny that they target people for sanctions, there have been reports that vulnerable people have been targeted and that DWP staff, are being forced to hit sanction targets or face disciplinary action. One Jobcentre Plus office is reported to have offered Easter egg prizes to staff who sanctioned the most customers.

The Demonstration which was organised by 'Tameside Against the Bedroom Tax and Cuts', 'Tameside Unemployed Workers' Association', 'Tameside Trades Union Council' and the 'Green Party' attracted local media interest. The protesters say that they intend to continue with further protests against unfair sanctions and intend to target businesses in Tameside that are participating in the government's unpaid forced labour schemes for the unemployed.

Rotherham: Those who looked the other way?

THE Home Secretary, Theresa May, has said that social workers, council bosses and police chiefs who failed to act to prevent the Rotherham sex abuse scandal ought to resign.  This follows a damning report produced by Professor Alexis Jay. 

Mrs May has said:
'I’ve seen the horrific cases they have looked into where young girls were the victims of the most appalling sexual exploitation and threats of violence, grooming and abuse and yet their calls for help went unheeded by the council or the police. I think everybody needs to look at the role they played in this and their position.'


Among those identified for failing in their responsibilities are Shaun Wright, South Yorkshire’s police and crime commissioner, who has so far refused to resign despite holding responsibility for children’s services on Rotherham council, and Joyce Thacker, head of the council’s children’s services.  Mr. Wright has resigned from the Labour Party after leading figures in the party told him he ought to give up his current job, but he has so far refused to resign his current position as police and crime commissioner.


Mr Wright, who was elected to the £85,000-a-year commissioner’s post in 2012, having previously served as a Labour councillor with responsibility for children’s services, said on Wednesday that he had no idea about the   'industrial scale' of the abuse that had taken place.


Prof Jay, for her part has insisted that, given her findings that 'nobody could say "I didn’t know".'


Others who will be challenged for their alleged roles in the scandal include:
Paul Laker, a Labour councillor; Jahangir Akhtar, the former deputy leader of Rotherham council; Dr Sonia Sharp, the director of children’s services between 2005 and 2008; and Diane Billups, the council’s director of education and head of children’s services between 2001 and 2005.


Mr. Laker, a former steel-worker, a cabinet member for children's services since 2010 and deputy council leader is claiming that he had only recently grasped the 'depth and breadth' of the sex abuse problem in Rotherham.  Mr. Akhtar, another former deputy leader of the council, was temporarily forced out of office after claims that he was aware of a relationship between one of his own relatives and a 14-year-old girl.  The police cleared him of any wrongdoing after an investigation, and he lost his seat on the council last May.  Mrs. Billups has since retired, and Dr. Sharp now works in a department of education in Austrialia.  Joyce Thacker, 56, is currently on £115,000-a-year as director of children and young people's services; she was in charge four years ago when five Asian men were convicted of raping three girls as young as 12. 


Ms. Thacker has said by way of explanation and justification:
'I would put the responsibility back on the parents. It is their duty to protect their children and keep them safe.  We couldn't be with them 24-hours a day.'

Yesterday, the former MP for Rotherham, Denise MacShane, was more straight-forward in accepting that he should have done more.  On BBC News Mr. MacShane said:
'I should have burrowed into this.  Perhaps, yes, as a true Guardian reader and a liberal leftie I suppose, I didn't want to rock the boat I didn't want to raise that too hard.'

It seems that Mr. MacShane has previously admitted that he, like other politicians, had feared losing Muslim votes if he aired 'the dirty secrets about bad practices in the Kashmiri Muslim community'.

We must wait to see if this mentality is more widespread among the politicians in our northern town halls.

Bolton Council's Suspension of Trade Unionists

YESTERDAY, Bolton Trade Union Council called off a demonstration set to be held at 6pm outside Bolton Town Hall in support of some leading trade union activists who have been suspended by the Labour Council, and are threatened with the loss of their jobs.  It was halted because Bolton's Labour Council is holding talks with the trade unions concerned in an endeavour to solve a dispute in which three leading trade union activists from Unison and the GMB have been suspended from work, and a further 19 trade unionists have been notified that they too could face disiplinary action. 

A leading local trade unionist from Bolton told Northern Voices:
'This all relates to events that took place in Bolton on the public sector's day of action.'

That public sector 'Day of Action' took place on Thursday the 10th, July, and involved Unison, the GMB, and Unite.  An informant from Bolton Trade Union Council has told N.V. that he believes:
'It is clear to us that the objective is to remove key activists prior to the £25 million cuts to be implemented next year.'

Many trade unionists in the region are disturbed that Bolton MBC, as a Labour Council, are using what they see as Tory anti-trade union legistlation to seemingly intimidate the local authority labour in their employ.


 

Manchester Royal Exchange presents Secret Theatre


SECRET THEATRE ARRIVES IN MANCHESTER WITH FOUR NEW PLAYS FROM THE UK’S MOST EXCITING WRITERS

 The Lyric Hammersmith Secret Theatre Company presents
 
SECRET
 
THEATRE
 
The Studio at The Royal Exchange Theatre
St Ann’s Square
Manchester
M2 7DH
Tuesday 21 October to Saturday 1 November
 

Fresh from the Lyric Hammersmith and the Edinburgh Festival, SECRET THEATRE – which features four new plays from four of the UK’s most exciting playwrights – arrives at Manchester’s Royal Exchange Theatre from Tuesday 21 October to Saturday 1 November.   

Presented in The Studio at the Royal Exchange Theatre by The Lyric Hammersmith Secret Theatre Company, all four pieces explore themes of love and loss, betrayal and revenge, failure and triumph and have been thrilling audiences with their brave, bold and inventive style.  

In 2013 the Lyric created the Secret Theatre Company – a 20-strong ensemble of actors, directors, writers and designers brought together to explore new ways of making theatre. Since their first provocative performance they have courted controversy and sparked debate across London. The Royal Exchange dates are part of a nationwide tour. 
 

CHAMBER PIECE (23 - 25 October) is a pitch-black comedy from up-and-coming writer Caroline Bird about power, lethal injection and the desperate need for a Twix. When an execution goes horribly wrong and the prisoner regains consciousness with no memory of his crimes the ruthlessly ambitious governor has 24-hours to prove his sanity before her death warrant expires.

GLITTERLAND (28 & 29 October) by Hayley Squires is a thrilling story of power, corruption and revenge inspired by John Webster’s THE WHITE DEVIL. The politicians and celebrities of the State of Glitterland collude to keep their people in a sedated stupor. The ruthless political advisor, Nemo, uses his starlet sister to manipulate those in power in a dangerous game of deception. As his enemies threaten to expose him, Nemo will stop at nothing in his quest for control.   

A SERIES OF INCREASINGLY IMPOSSIBLE ACTS (21 October - 1 November) is devised by the Secret Theatre Company. In this riotous and uplifting show the company try to complete a series of increasingly impossible acts. With the audience in charge of who performs each night, the show will be different every night.   

SHOW 6 (30 October - 1 November) is a new thriller by Mark Ravenhill which asks the question “Are you who you think you are?” The story weaves together a fatal car crash, a memory uncovered and a secret that leads to revolution.                                                                                                                                     
For further information please contact JOHN GOODFELLOW (Press & Communications Manager) on 0161 615 6783 / john.goodfellow@royalexchange.co.uk.

Online information available at www.royalexchange.co.uk/crocodiles

Thursday, 21 August 2014

Liverpool Exhibition of Miner's Strike photos

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Liverpool Exhibition of Photographs on the 30th Anniversary of the 1984-1985 Miner's Strike by Reportdigital.co.uk 
If you would like an additional image for your "Whats On" please email us with the size you require.

Note: The exhibition coincides with the annual TUC conference at the Liverpool Echo Arena.

Exhibition of Photographs on the 30th Anniversary of the 1984-1985 Miner's Strike by Reportdigital.co.uk

Thirty years ago Margaret Thatcher hoped to transform Britain into a "Greed is Good" society, "The method is economics" proposed Thatcher "but the aim is to change the soul". To do so the Conservative government declared war on the trade unions. They implemented a secret plan to take on the unions one by one, until they came to the National Union of Mineworkers. In March 1984 the government provoked a strike - expecting victory in a few weeks. The strike lasted 12 months. They were to be demonised and discredited by the media. Isolated, beaten and starved back to work - yet despite desperate circumstances and in the face of everything that the government could throw at them, 150,000 miners and their families fought back and very nearly won. In the years that followed, the most productive and efficient coal industry in the world was closed and whole communities were destroyed, wages were widely repressed, industry, utilities and housing privatised and the City of London deregulated... creating the seeds of the crisis we now face.
A small group of photographers stood alongside the miners as they struggled for their jobs and communities and endeavoured to picture it from their point of view. This exhibition shows you some of the best of those pictures.
Monday 8th to Saturday 20th September, 2014
Open evenings: Monday 8th & Tues 9th September, until 9pm
TUC delegates very welcome
Opening hours on other days:
Monday -Friday: 11am-4:30pm
Saturday: 12 noon-4pm
Sunday: Closed
The Fallout Factory, 97 Dale Street, Liverpool, L2 2JD


Kind Regards

John Harris (NUJ)
Tel. +44 (0)1789 262151
Mobile: +44 (0)7831121483
Online photographic and video footage library at: http://www.reportdigital.co.uk

Saturday, 16 August 2014

Police to Interview Sir Cliff Richard

AFTER the search by police on Thursday of Sir Cliff Richard's Berkshire home, it is reported that they are planning to talk to him about an alleged sex crime against a young lad at an evangelist event in a Sheffield football stadium at Bramall Lane in 1985.  Sir Cliff now 73, is in Portugal right now, and he has described the allegation made against him as 'completely false'.

Detective Superintendent Matt Fenwick, of South Yorkshire Police, has said the investigation was at a very early stage and nobody had been arrested.   D.S. Fenwick said:  'A search warrant has been granted after police received an allegation of a sexual nature dating back to the 1980s. This involved a young boy under the age of 16 years.'

No arrest warrant has been issued and the police say that they have no plans to search other properties.  Sir Cliff's solicitors are already in touch with the South Yorkshire police, and there has been some disquiet about the presence of the BBC during Thursday's police search of the premises in Berkshire.

The evangelist event in 1985 that was led by the U.S. preacher Billy Graham attracted some 24,000 people to the first of eight nights of sermons at the Sheffield football stadium, according to reports at the time.  When Billy Graham invited people to come forward to show a commitment to Jesus, 2,000 people walked onto the pitch.

Sir Cliff Richard, OBE, was born in India, Harry Rodger Webb, in 1940, and  is the third-top-selling singles artist in the United Kingdom's history, with total sales of over 21 million units in the UK and he has reportedly sold an estimated 250 million records worldwide.

Thursday, 14 August 2014

Blogger accuses council of North Korean censorship. As Tameside becomes a 'one-party state?



READERS of Northern Voices (NV) will be aware that in previous issues of NV magazine, we have reported on how some local authorities such as Tameside in Greater Manchester, have attempted to censor local news stories on the pretext of promoting ‘community cohesion’.

In 2009 (see NV issue No 10), we reported that Tameside Council were holding regular meetings with local newspaper editors to 'gather information and stop sensationalist reporting which might otherwise start or add to rising tensions.'  The source for this information (also reported in Private Eye 3/10/08), was a document entitled: ‘Guidance for local authorities on community cohesion planning and tension monitoring’ (page 40) produced by the Department of Communities and local Government (DOCLG).  

Although the council denied practicing censorship – 'The council does not gather information with a view to censoring media reports, it has no powers to do this…', DOCLG told us that the information contained in their document had been written and supplied by Tameside Council (see NV issue No 11).
Having been caught with their trousers down, so to speak, one would have thought that the council would have learned a salutary lesson. Yet a local blogger, who uses the name Curmudgeon, recently posted on his blog that Tameside council bosses had decreed that council employees were to be denied access to certain websites.   Curmudgeon says:

“Not to be outdone and in an effort not to deviate one iota from the controlling ways of the young Korean dictator, Tameside Council bosses, have adopted a strict political strategy, strikingly similar to that of Kim Jong-Un, and as a first strike have allegedly decreed that all civil servants working on Tameside Council computers, will be denied the right to access the thoughts of certain ‘political bloggers’ in an effort to subvert and control access to opposing political opinions and block access to legitimate bloggers who frequently engage in the questioning of the Labour dominated council decisions.'

Curmudgeon claims that both his own blog of the same name and the blog ‘Tameside Citizen’ are forbidden to council employees.

Korea’s ‘Supreme Leader’, Kim Jong-Un, is well known for purging ‘factional filth’: he recently had his own uncle executed. But while some might think that comparing Tameside Council with the hermetically sealed society of North Korea is somewhat ridiculous, the analogy might not be that inappropriate.

Last year (April 2013), the Electoral Reform Society (ERS), stated that many Labour dominated councils in the North West, were 'failing the basic test of democracy' because many Labour councils held a ‘super-majority’ of seats. The ERS claimed that councils such as Tameside ran the risk of becoming ‘one-party states’ like North Korea, China or Cuba.

Daren Hughes, director of research at the ERS, told the Manchester Evening News that 'one-party state’ councils could be more likely to be ‘complacent’ and 'hand themselves increases to their allowances and expenses.'

While Tameside to all intents and purposes already resembles a one-party state, the borough is not quite yet in the league of Pyongyang, even though its councillors are as keen as mustard, when it comes to giving themselves increases in their allowances and expenses. Yet as the blogger, Curmudgeon, rightly points out, censorship is always a sign of a weak and frightened government that has something to hide from the rest of us, and secrets to keep.
______________________________________________

The printed version of NORTHERN VOICES 10 or N.V.11, may be obtained as follows:
Postal subscription: £5 for the next two issues (post included)
Cheques payable to 'Northern Voices' at
c/o 52, Todmorden Road,
Burnley, Lancashire BB10 4AH.
Tel.: 0161 793 5122.
email: northernvoices@hotmail.com
_______________________________________________

Police Search Home of Cliff Richard

CLIFF Richards has had to deny an allegation of historic sexual abuse after police today searched his Berkshire home.  In a statement as South Yorkshire police searched his home in Berkshire Sir Cliff said:
'For many months I have been aware of allegations against me of historic impropriety which have been circulating online. The allegations are completely false.   Up until now I have chosen not to dignify the false allegations with a response, as it would just give them more oxygen.  However, the police attended my apartment in Berkshire today without notice, except it would appear to the press.  I am not presently in the UK but it goes without saying that I will co-operate fully should the police wish to speak to me.   Beyond stating that today's allegation is completely false it would not be appropriate to say anything further until the police investigation has concluded.'
 
 The police say they didn't have to break in as they were let in, perhaps by somebody who is looking after the house.   

Last week, the police claim Sir Cliff was at his home in Portugal where he held a concert at his wine estate.   He owns a vast property there with a vineyard where he produces wine.  The Cliff Richard's official website urges readers to buy his 'Vida Nova wine, jewellery and calendar, to say nothing of DVDs, CDs and official merchandise'.  It is not known in he is still at his home in Portugal, but he has said in the past that he spends his summers there and his winters in Barbados, where he owns another property.

This isn't part of Scotland Yard's investigation into historical sex crimes - Operation Yewtree - launched in the wake of the Jimmy Savile scandal.    It seems that the initial allegation was made to the Metropolitan Police and then passed on to South Yorkshire.  This is very much a South Yorkshire Police investigation. 







 

World War I & the job of the historian


Adam Hochschild's interview with Stephen Jackson:              

Adam_Hochschild.jpgRenowned author Adam Hochschild’s most recent work To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918 (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011) presented a heartbreaking tale of the mass slaughter of the First World War and a sympathetic portrayal of those who opposed the conflict. In this Q&A, he gives his thoughts on the book and offers his perspective on the role of the publicly engaged historian. 

Stephen Jackson: What was it about the subject that inspired you to write it, and what would you argue was your most important contribution to the historical discussion on the First World War?

Adam Hochschild: I’ve always been deeply fascinated by those who resisted the First World War, ever since I read a biography of Bertrand Russell as a teenager, and then later Sheila Rowbotham’s work on Alice Wheeldon. To have had the courage to speak out so boldly when there was such jingoism in the air deeply impressed me.  I also found a very strong echo in those times of something I had been deeply involved in:  the movement against the Vietnam War here in the United States.  Then, too, a war divided members of families from each other; hence I was intrigued to see the divided families of Britain in 19141918, and used that as a narrative structure for my book.  In the Vietnam era, too, we had an epidemic of government spying on citizens—when much later, using the Freedom of Information Act, I was able to get the records of surveillance on me by the FBI, CIA and military intelligence, they amounted to more than 100 pages and I was a very small fish in that movement.  Hence it fascinated me to read the government surveillance records from Scotland Yard and military intelligence on the UK dissenters of 19141918.  I felt I was seeing at work the same mindset as that of the FBI agents who reported on me.
 
I’m by no means the first person to write about those brave British dissenters.  I certainly hope my book, and those of others, helps put them in the foreground as we remember the war. Paradoxically, most people today would agree that the First World War remade the world for the worse in almost every conceivable way, yet all our traditional ways of remembering it parades, monuments, museums, military cemeteries celebrate those who fought and not those who refused to fight.
 
Stephen Jackson: In the years since the publication of the work, what sort of feedback from the scholarly community and the general public did you receive?  How do you think that contemporary events, especially a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan, shaped the response to your work?

Adam Hochschild:  I’ve always believed that you can write for a general audience and at the same time meet the highest scholarly standards for accuracy and the documenting of sources. This book got good reviews and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; at the same time many university history departments have been kind to me.  I was writer-in-residence at the history department of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst this past spring and will be doing a speaking tour of some half dozen campuses in the US and Europe this fall, talking about the war.
 
I’ve also heard from several descendants of people mentioned in the book one of the great pleasures of writing history, I’ve found.  And sometimes, unexpectedly, I’ve heard from other people as well who are connected to this patch of history.  After the book came out, an American mining company official whom I’d met a few years before in a godforsaken village in eastern Congo, wrote me that in 1917 his grandfather, a conscientious objector, had been hanged in effigy in his home town in Iowa.
 
And yes, I think the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan show what tragic mistakes one can make by not studying history more closely.  How similar the illusion of President George W. Bush when he landed on that aircraft carrier in 2003 in front of the sign 'Mission Accomplished' to the illusion of Kaiser Wilhelm II when he told his troops in August, 1914:  'You will be home before the leaves fall from the trees.'
 
Stephen Jackson: This year marks the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War.  What do you think is or should be the place of conscientious objectors and leftist anti-war activists in the public memory of World War I?

Adam Hochschild: None of these people were perfect, but on the central issue of their time, they were essentially right, and should be honored.  Harry Patch, the last British veteran of the war to die 5 years ago, at 111 said it best: the war 'was not worth it.  It was not worth one life, let alone all the millions.'
 
Stephen Jackson: How can scholars teaching undergraduate or graduate courses in British History or Modern European History incorporate non-traditional themes such as anti-war activism into lessons on the Great War?

Adam Hochschild: There are rich primary sources: the writings and speeches of outspoken war opponents, like Bertrand Russell and E.D. Morel in Britain, or Jane Addams and Eugene V. Debs in the United States.  Periodicals that these anti-war movements published. Letters and memoirs by war resisters who went to prison, not just in the U.S. and Britain, but in other countries as well. I hope someone is thinking of pulling a collection of material like this together into a reader!  And there are fine secondary sources as well. That list could be a long one, but I’ll just mention Jo Vellacott’s Bertrand Russell and the Pacifists in the First World War, a careful, well-written book I learned a lot from.
 
Stephen Jackson: The 19th century German historian Leopold von Ranke famously said historians can 'merely tell how it really was,' and should not judge the past nor attempt to give moral guidance for the present.   To End All Wars, and your work more generally, compellingly does just that. How would you describe your underlying philosophy for writing history?  What role do you think that the historian — as an historian — should play in engaging in contemporary political and ethical discussions?

Adam Hochschild:  Well, I’m certain in favor of telling it how it was and with the highest possible standards of accuracy. In real life, seldom are one’s heroes totally heroic or one’s villains totally villainous.  In To End All Wars, for instance, the fiery pacifist Charlotte Despard had a kind of knee-jerk far-left reaction to everything that would have made her difficult to talk to, although I agree with her about the war.  But her brother, Field Marshal Sir John French, though he exemplified the worst type of unthinking generalship in the field, seems to have been a warm-hearted person of great charm whom it would have been delightful to spend an evening with. One should enjoy such paradoxes and not try to deny them.
 
But beyond that, I think sometimes an historian can provide something that’s relevant to contemporary political discussions without having to hit people over the head with it. In my book, for example, I don’t talk about the Iraq or Afghanistan wars.  But whenever I give a talk about the First World War, the first question anybody asks is:  do you see an analogy?

Monday, 11 August 2014

Wigan Diggers' Festival 2014


Wigan Diggers' Festival
Celebrating the life and ideas of Wigan born and bred Gerrard Winstanley (1609-1676)
Inspirational theorist and spokesperson of the World's first true Socialists known as 'The Diggers'

APPEAL FOR SPONSORSHIP FOR 4th WIGAN DIGGERS’ FESTIVAL

To all Socialist, Trades Union, Labour,
Co-operative & Other Supportive Organisations

Dear Brothers & Sisters

I am writing to you on behalf of the Wigan Diggers' Festival Committee to appeal for the financial support of your organisation in the staging of this year’s Festival. The FREE open air event, which last year again, attracted over 2,000 people, will take place in the Wiend area of Wigan town centre on Saturday 13th September 2014 between 11.00am and 9.30pm..

This year’s festival will be officially opened by Labour MP John McDonnell who will also talk about the lasting influence of Gerrard Winstanley and The Diggers on today’s working class movement.

The festival will consist of a wide range of activities including live music, poetry and comedy performances, audio visual presentations, an exhibition, town centre procession, beer tent, food, book and other stalls. There will also be a symbolic digging re-enactment in which actor John Graham Davies will play the role of the Diggers’ spokesperson. In addition to that, there will be performances by BBC Radio 2 Folk Award winners ‘The Lucy Ward Band’, Merry Hell, Shamus Oblivion & The Megadeath Morris Men, the Liverpool Socialist Singers & Bolton Clarion choir and more than 20 other live acts, plus educational talks by TV documentary maker and “Debt Generation” author David Malone, and Dr. John Gurney (health permitting) author of “Gerrard Winstanley: The Diggers’ Life & Legacy” about the historic Wiganer and his movement, also known as the “True Levellers”.

Although, many of our expenses have already been covered, and many of those taking part are providing their services either for free, or for little other than their travelling costs, as a result of our move to an outdoor location two years ago, the costs of staging the festival have risen considerably. This is not least as a result of our needing to hire professional security to comply with the Council’s licensing conditions (and free public liability insurance cover), the hire of Portaloos, a much larger outdoor PA system, a professional sound engineer, stage lighting, and the cost of various weather proofing measures (circa £3,500 combined cost).

In order to ensure we are able to cover these costs, which will also enable us to stage next year’s event, we are in vital need of the financial assistance of sympathetic organisations such as your own. If you can help us in any way then please send a cheque, made payable to the Gerrard Winstanley Society, to the address below. Your valuable support will be acknowledged in the festival programme.

Yours in solidarity

Stephen Hall
for and behalf of Wigan Diggers' Festival Committee
39 Spa Road, Atherton, Manchester M46 9NR

Tel: 01942 886645/07724 139278 or E-Mail: stevechik@talktalk.net

Manchester TUC Meeting against anti-union laws

Comrades, 

Manchester Trades Council has organised a public meeting on the eve of the Labour Party conference to campaign against the anti union laws. The meeting will be held on September 20th at 18:30 in the Mechanics Institute. The event will also be a fundraiser for the Manchester Unemployed Workers Centre. Speakers will include:
 
John Mcdonnell MP
Len Mcluskey - Unite General Secretary
Ian Hodson - President BFAWU
Lynn Collins - Secretary North West TUC
Angela Raynor - UNISON North West Regional Convenor
You can find the facebook event for this on the link below: 
Be sure to send this onto your members and contacts as this is a very important event.
In Solidarity, 
 
Alex (Alex Davidson)
Secretary - Manchester Trades Union Council
07842829309 

Maxine Peake as Hamlet at Royal Exchange

MAXINE PEAKE TAKES TITLE ROLE IN BOLD RE-IMAGINING OF SHAKESPEARE’S MOST ICONIC WORK 

HAMLET
by William Shakespeare   

Directed by Sarah Frankcom

Designed by Amanda Stoodley 

The Royal Exchange Theatre,
St Ann’s Square, Manchester.
Thursday 11 September – Saturday 18 October  

 
PRESS NIGHT: Tuesday 16 September at 7.30pm

Acclaimed theatre and television actress Maxine Peake is set to star in a bold re-imagining of William Shakespeare’s HAMLET by William Shakespeare at the Royal Exchange Theatre - taking the title role in a new production which runs from Thursday 11 September to Saturday 18 October.   

Launching the theatre’s new Autumn Winter 14 / 15 Season – the production reunites her with Royal Exchange Artistic Director Sarah Frankcom following the huge success of THE MASQUE OF ANARCHY at last year’s Manchester International Festival.   

BAFTA nominated for her performances in both THE VILLAGE and HANCOCK AND JOAN, Maxine’s many other TV credits include SILK, RED RIDING and Myra Hindley in SEE NO EVIL.

Previous theatre credits for the Royal Exchange include RUTHERFORD AND SON, THE CHILDREN’S HOUR and, most recently, MISS JULIE.   

In Shakespeare’s most iconic play, Hamlet’s father is dead and Denmark has crowned a new king. Consumed by grief, Hamlet struggles to exact revenge with devastating consequences. HAMLET explodes with big idea and is the ultimate play about loyalty, love, betrayal, murder and madness.  
 
This stripped back, fresh and fast-paced version, will see Maxine Peake create a Hamlet for now – a Hamlet for Manchester.  
 
She said: 'Sarah and I have looked for a project that would stretch and excite us and HAMLET just seemed the next natural step to challenge us both in so many ways. I am so excited at how gender swapping can affect and throw up new ways of looking at this theatrical masterpiece.'   

Sarah Frankcom’s other recent Royal Exchange credits include A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE, MISS JULIE, ORPHEUS DESCENDING, THAT DAY WE SANG and BLINDSIDED.  

She said: 'Maxine started her acting career in our youth theatre. Her performances have thrilled our audiences and the Royal Exchange is her local theatre. HAMLET is a massively exciting challenge for any actor and director.' 

Also appearing are Claire Benedict as Player King and Marcella; Gillian Bevan as Polonia; Jodie McNee as Rosencrantz; Barbara Marten as Gertrude; John Shrapnel as Claudius and the Ghost; Katie West as Ophelia and Ashley Zhangazha as Laertes.   

The cast also includes Thomas Arnold, Michelle Butterly, Dean Gregory, Tachia Newall, Peter Singh and Ben Stott.   

Members of the Royal Exchange’s Young Company will also be appearing as the Young Players.   

The production is designed by Amanda Stoodley and music is composed by Alex Baranowski. The creative team is completed by Lee Curran (lighting), Peter Rice (sound), Imogen Knight (movement) and Kevin McCurdy (fights).  
 
  • Maxine Peake will also be joining the Exchange as an Associate Artist this autumn.  Her new role will draw on her considerable talents as one of the nation’s best-loved actors and also as a writer. It will include opportunities for her to get involved in the theatre’s pioneering work with community groups and young people - and work with young actors from across the city.

Commemoration of the London Squat of 1946

THE famous Central London squat history walk

... featuring edited highlights of the walk, including

• housing saved by squatting from developers
• buildings that housed hundreds of people and would otherwise have been left
to rot
• protest squats from 1946 to date...
and...?

This version of the walk has been hastily cobbled together because someone
at BBC World Service expressed interest and will be recording it (to be cut
down to a mere couple of soundbites of course). She also wants to talk to
current squatters, in their homes, in case there are any sensible current
squatters willing to talk to media (the two rarely go together)

Tuesday August 12th

meet 6pm in Tolmers Square (off North Gower Street NW1)
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Peterloo March from Bolton

Peterloo Commemorative March - Bolton to Manchester 17th August 2014

Join at any of the stopping points indicated or on route.

8.00 am - Leave from Bolton Socialist Club Wood Street. Head towards Kearsley via Bradshawgate and Manchester Road (B6536), Bolton Road at Moses Gate, along Market Street and through the underpass to pick up the A666 Bolton road.

9.15 am ( 3.6 miles) - Moss Rose pub at Kearsley. Head along A666 to Swinton to junction with A6044 (3 miles)

10.20 am (7.1 miles) - Henry Boddinton pub at Swinton. Continue along A666 to merge with A6 at Broad St.

11.20 (9.7 miles) - Salford Crescent Station. Continue along A6 through Salford, possible pausing at the Working Class History Library and the Peoples History Museum.

12.00 - 12.30pm (11.4 miles) - Arrive St Peter�s Square, Manchester.

You can let the organisers know in advance if you intend to join by texting 0875 646 6060, or by emailing chris_chilton@hotmail.com.

Care Workers vote for strike action

Care Workers on 90% majority to take strike action
BARNET UNISON has concluded a ballot of care workers based on a slightly improved “offer” from Your Choice Barnet (YCB) following the close of negotiations in mid-July. The offer still means our members would lose 8.31% from their wages rather than 9.5%. It still represents a swingeing cut to their wages at a time when other workers up and down the country have rejected a1% per cent pay rise. On a 73% turnout 90% voted in favour of taking action to reinstate their pay.

During the negotiations YCB was very open regarding their finances. Even if our members took this hit on their wages now, YCB couldnot guarantee this would be an end to the cuts in pay even in the short term. Indeed their proposed budget for the next year breaks even only if they pay nothing on the loan from Barnet Homes. YCB confirmed in the negotiations this left a huge funding gap. This lack of reassurance from YCB that they would not be coming back for more cuts undoubtedly contributed to the resounding rejection of the latestpay cut.
 
What the negotiations did reveal is thescandalous charging arrangements foisted onto YCB, which make it difficult to see how YCB can befinancially viable in the future without making the workers’ pay an even heftier price. Significantly where a service user fails to turn up to the day service e.g. because they are sick, YCBcannot charge for the service. Yet YCB will have organised their staffing based on those service users turning up and have to bear the brunt of those staffing costs when the service user does not appear. Many service users need 1 to 1 support. The failure to turn up or “no shows” costs YCB a significant loss of income. This significant sum of money would go a long way torestoring our members’ wages. Barnet Council is refusing to pay YCB for these “no shows” and yet this is a company whollyowned by Barnet Council!
Our members pointed to the fact that if they were to cancel their child’s childcare arrangements without a week’s notice, they are still charged. For any course, you have to pay up front and turn up or lose the money. So if we are to adopt an “oh-so- very-private-sector” ethos how can this charging arrangement for YCB be allowed?
 
UNISON Branch Secretary John Burgess said:
'If we are to avoid strike action we need urgent talks betweenBarnet Council and Your Choice Barnet. It is clear that thecurrent payment mechanism & lack of referrals from the Council are severely hindering the financial viability of YCB. It beggars belief that the Task & Finish Group in November 2013 failed to spot the glaring financial crisis haunting YCB. To carry on as is,is not an option, either there is a three way meeting in order to come to an arrangement whereby YCB has a real futureor the Council honours its promise to return the service in house. It isunacceptable that service users, parents/carer and our members should have to continue to bear the brunt of failed business case imposed on them by Barnet Council.'
 

Friday, 8 August 2014

Letter to Tony Lloyd Greater Manchester Police Commissioner

THE GREATER MANCHESTER COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF TRADE UNION COUNCILS IS THE LEAD TUC BODY ACROSS GREATER MANCHESTER, AND IT HAS CALLED FOR AN URGENT REVIEW OF THE GREATER MANCHESTER SPECIALIST PUBLIC ORDER UNIT AS A CONSEQUENCE OF ITS POLICING STRATEGY AND TACTICS AT BARTON MOSS (ANTI-FRACKING) PROTECTION CAMP IN SALFORD.
 
Along with evidence that some Greater Manchester Police (GMP) officers are breaching force regulations by failing to wear shoulder identification and serious questions about the impartiality of GMP�s policing operation at Barton Moss, Manchester�s Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Lloyd now faces a call by trade unionists for an urgent independent review of GMP's public order unit. 
 
The letter to Tony Lloyd concludes:
'We are aware of announcements you have made pertaining to new committees and actions you are taking in areas of your work. We ask that you:
 
1. Independently of the Chief Constable review the role and function of the Tactical Aid Unit and the policing of protest.
 
2. Make further statements regarding the legacy of the policing and criminal justice experiences of the Barton Moss protesters with a priority aim of regaining the confidence of the citizens of Greater Manchester who have directly lost confidence in the police because of this episode.
 
3. Proactively communicate regularly with active and up to date trade unionists in Greater Manchester involving the body formed and supported by many stakeholders to provide focus and leadership to all trade unions in the county � The Greater Manchester Association of Trades Councils (GMATUC).
 
4. Prioritise and make explicit in your work plans, publications and statements the protection of human rights in Greater Manchester.
 
5. Use your position to recognise the importance to human rights and justice of journalists, media practitioners, legal observers and independent witnesses who reveal the truth about matters of public life. 

NETPOL link: for GMATUC Letter

Those killed in Gaza!


AT least 1,875 Palestinians have been killed in Gaza since Israel began its relentless assault on July 8.
Among those killed, at least 430 were aged 18 or younger.
More than 60 families have been massacred in Gaza in the past 26 days.
80 percent of the people killed by Israeli forces in Gaza were civilians.
The youngest victim has been Mustafa Wael al-Ghoul, only 24 days old
The next four youngest victims have been two-month old Rizk Abu Taha, four-month-old Mohammed Anas, five-month old Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum and 8-month-old Sama Nael al-Barawi.
The oldest victim, Mohammed Mazen Faraj Daher, who died on July 31, was 99 years old.
The following Victims' names and ages were compiled based on information released by the Gaza health ministry.
(Remember -- there are more than 1300 others waiting to be identified and named.)
1. Mohammed Sha�aban, 24, was killed in a bombing of his car in Gaza City.
2. Ahmad Sha�aban, 30, died in the same bombing.
3. Khadir al-Bashiliki, 45, died in the same bombing.
4. Rashad Yaseen, 27, was killed in a bombing of the Nusseirat refugee camp in central Gaza.
5. Riad Mohammed Kawareh, 50, was killed in a bombing of his family�s home in Khan Younis.
6. Seraj Ayad Abed al-A�al, 8, was wounded in the same bombing and succumbed to his injuries on Tuesday evening.
7. Mohammed Ayman Ashour, 15, died in the same bombing.
8. Bakr Mohammed Joudah, 22, died in the same bombing.
9. Ammar Mohammed Joudah, 26, died in the same bombing.
10. Hussein Yousef Kawareh, 13, died in the same bombing.
11. Mohammed Ibrahim Kawareh, 50, died in the same bombing.
12. Bassim Salim Kawareh, 10, died in the same bombing.
13. Mousa Habib, 16, from Gaza City�s al-Shujayeh neighborhood, was killed along with his 22-year old cousin while the pair were riding a motorcycle.
14. Mohammed Habib, 22, was killed with Mousa Habib.
15. Sakr Aysh al-Ajouri, 22, was killed in an attack on Jabalia, in northern Gaza.
16. Ahmad Na�el Mehdi, 16, from Gaza City�s Sheikh Radwan neighborhood, was killed in a bombing that wounded two of his friends.
17. Hafiz Mohammed Hamad, 30, an Islamic Jihad commander, was killed in the bombing of his home in Beit Hanoun, along with five of his family members.
18. Ibrahim Mohammed Hamad, 26, died in the same bombing.
19. Mehdi Mohammed Hamad, 46, died in the same bombing.
20. Fawzia Khalil Hamad, 62, died in the same bombing.
21. Dunia Mehdi Hamad, 16, died in the same bombing.
22. Suha Hamad, 25, died in the same bombing.
23. Suleiman Salman Abu Soaween, 22, was killed.
Wednesday, July 9:
24. Abdel Hadi Jamaat al-Sufi, 24, was killed in a bombing near the Rafah crossing.
25. Naifeh Farjallah, 80, was killed in an airstrike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City.
26. Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek, 60, was killed in the bombing of Gaza�s central governorate along with his son.
27. Khaled Abu Kweek, 31, Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek�s son, was killed in the same bombing.
28. Mohammed Areef, 13, died in a bombing in Sha�af.
28. Amir Areef, 10, died in the same bombing.
30. Mohammed Malakiyeh, 18 months old, died in a bombing along with his mother and a young man.
31. Hana Malakiyeh, 27, Mohammed Malakiyeh�s mother, died in the same bombing.
32. Hatem Abu Salem, 28, died in the same bombing.
33. Mohammed Khaled al-Nimri, 22
34. Sahar Hamdan, 40, died in the bombing of her home in Beit Hanoun.
35. Ibrahim Masri, 14, Sahar Hamdan�s son, was killed in the same bombing.
36. Mahmoud Nahid al-Nawasra was killed in a bombing in al-Meghazi.
37. Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra, 4, was killed in the same bombing and arrived at the hospital �in shreds.�
38. Nidal Khalaf al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 5, was killed in the same bombing.
39. Salah Awwad al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 6, was killed in the same bombing. His body was found under the rubble of the house.
40. Aisha Nijm al-Meghazi, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
41. Amal Youssef Abdel Ghafour, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
42. Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour, an 18-month-old girl, was killed in the same bombing.
43. Rashid al-Kafarneh, 30, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was bombed.
44. Ibrahim Daoud al-Balawi, 24
45. Abdel Rahman Jamal al-Zamli, 22
46. Ibrahim Ahmad Abideen, 42
47. Mustafa Abu Mar, 20
48. Khalid Abu Mar, 23
49. Mazen Farj al-Jarbah, 30, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
50. Marwan Slim, 27, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
51. Hani Saleh Hamad, 57, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun along with his son Ibrahim.
52. Ibrahim Hamad, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
53. Salima Hassan Musallim al-Arja, 60, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded five others.
54. Maryam Atieh Mohammed al-Arja, 11, was killed in the same bombing.
55. Hamad Shahab, 37
56. Ibrahim Khalil Qanun, 24, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
57. Mohammed Khalil Qanun, 26, was killed in the same attack.
58. Hamdi Badieh Sawali, 33, was killed in the same attack.
59. Ahmad Sawali, 28, was killed in the same attack.
60. Suleiman Salim al-Astal, 55, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
61. Mohammed al-Aqqad, 24
62. Ra'ed Shalat, 37, was killed in a bombing that wounded 6 others.
Thursday, July 10:
63. Asma Mahmoud al-Hajj, 22, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that killed eight members of the same family and wounded 16 other people.
64. Basmah Abdel Fattah al-Hajj, 57, was wounded in the bombing and succumbed to her injuries shortly afterwards.
65. Mahmoud Lutfi al-Hajj, 58, died in the same bombing.
66. Tarek Mahmoud al-Hajj, 18, died in the same bombing.
67. Sa'ad Mahmoud al-Hajj, 17, died in the same bombing.
68. Najla Mahmoud al-Hajj, 29, died in the same bombing.
69. Fatima Mahmoud al-Hajj, 12, died in the same bombing.
70. Omar Mahmoud al-Hajj, 20, died in the same bombing.
71. Ahmad Salim al-Astal, 24, was killed in the bombing of a beach house in Khan Younis that critically wounded more than 15 people.
72. Mousa Mohammed al-Astal, 50, was killed in the same bombing. The two bodies were recovered four hours after the bombing.
73. Ra'ed al-Zawareh, 33, succumbed to his wounds and died. The location of his death was unreported.
74. Baha' Abu al-Leil, 35, was killed in a bombing.
75. Salim Qandil, 27, was killed in the same bombing.
76. Omar al-Fyumi, 30, was killed in the same bombing.
77. Abdullah Ramadan Abu Ghazzal, 5, was killed in a bombing in Beit Lahiya.
78. Ismail Hassan Abu Jamah, 19, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that injured two children, one critically.
79. Hassan Awda Abu Jamah, 75, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
80. Mohammed Ahsan Ferwanah, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
81. Yasmin Mohammed Mutawwaq, 4 was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
82. Mahmoud Wulud, 26, was killed in a bombing of a civilian vehicle in northern Gaza. His remains were taken to Kamal Adwan Hospital in Jabalia.
83. Hazem Balousha, 30, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
84. Nour Rafik Adi al-Sultan, 27, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
85. Ahmad Zaher Hamdan, 24, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
86. Mohammed Kamal al-Kahlout, 25, was killed in a bombing in Jabalia.
87. Sami Adnan Shaldan, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
88. Jamah Atieh Shalouf, 25, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
89. Bassem Abdel Rahman Khattab, 6, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
90. Abdullah Mustafa Abu Mahrouk, 22, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
Friday, July 11:
91. Anas Rizk Abu al-Kas, 33, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
92. Nour Marwan al-Najdi, 10, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
93. Mohammed Mounir Ashour, 25, was killed in a bombing on the al-Ghanam family home in Rafah.
94. Ghalia Deeb Jabr al-Ghanam, 7, was killed in the same bombing.
95. Wasim Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 23, was killed in the same bombing.
96. Mahmoud Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 26, was killed in the same bombing.
97. Kifah Shahada Deeb al-Ghanam, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
98. Ra�ed Hani Abu Hani, 31, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
99. Shahraman Ismail Abu al-Kas, 42, was killed in a bombing in a refugee camp in central Gaza.
100. Mazen Mustafa Aslan, 63, was killed in the same bombing.
101. Mohammed Rabih Abu Humeidan, 65, was killed in shelling that struck northern Gaza.
102. Abdel Halim Ashra, 54, was killed in an airstrike on Wednesday in the area of Birka Deir al-Balah, but his body wasn�t discovered until Friday.
103. Saher Abu Namous, 3, was killed in an airstrike on his home in northern Gaza.
104. Hussein al-Mamlouk, 47, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
105. Saber Sukkar, 80, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
106. Nasser Rabih Mohammed Samamah, 49, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
Saturday, July 12:
107. Rami Abu Massaad, 23, was killed in a strike on Deir al-Balah.
108. Mohammed al-Samiri, 24, was killed in the same attack.
109. Houssam Deeb al-Razayneh, 39, was killed in an attack on Jabalia.
110. Anas Youssef Kandil, 17, was killed in the same attack.
111. Abdel Rahim Saleh al-Khatib, 38, was killed in the same attack.
112. Youssef Mohammed Kandil, 33, was killed in the same attack.
113. Mohammed Idriss Abu Saninah, 20, was killed in the same attack.
114. Hala Wishahi, 31, was killed in an attack on the Mabarra association for the disabled in Jabalia.
115. Suha Abu Saade, 38, was killed in the same attack.
116. Ali Nabil Basal, 32, was killed in a strike on western Gaza City.
117. Mohammed Bassem al-Halabi, 28, was killed in the same strike.
118. Mohammed al-Sowayti, 20, was killed in the same strike.
119. Ibrahim Nabil Humaide, 30, was killed in a bombing in the Tufah neighborhood in eastern Gaza City.
120. Hassan Ahmed Abu Ghoush, 24, was killed in the same attack.
121. Ahmed Mahmoud al-Ballaoui, 26, was killed in the same attack.
122. Ratib Sabahi al-Sifi, 22, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with five others.
123. Azmi Mahmoud Abid, 51, was killed in the same attack.
124. Nidal Mahmoud Abu al-Malish, 22, was killed in the same attack.
125. Suleiman Said Abid, 56, was killed in the same attack.
126. Ghassan Ahmad al-Masri, 25, was killed in the same attack.
127. Mustafa Mohammed Anaieh, 58, was killed in the same attack.
128. Rafa�at Youssef Amer, 36, succumbed to wounds sustained in a bombing in Gaza City.
129. Ghazi Mustafa Areef, 62, died when his home in Gaza City was bombed. His son sustained serious injuries.
130. Mohammed Adriss Abu Sulim, 20, was killed in a bombing in Jabaliya.
131. Fadi Yaqub Sakr, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
132. Qassem Jaber Adwan Awdeh, 16, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
133. Mohammed Ahmad Bassal, 19, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
134. Muhannad Youssef Dhahir, 23, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
135. Mahmoud Abdallah Shratiha, 53, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza.
136. Shadi Mohammed Zarb, 21, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded three others.
137. Imad Bassam Zarb, 21, was killed in the same bombing.
138. Nahid Ta�im al-Batash, 41, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with 16 family members. Dozens more were wounded in the same attack.
139. Baha Majid al-Batash, 28, was killed in the same bombing.
140. Qassi Isam al-Batash, 12, was killed in the same bombing.
141. Aziza Youssef al-Batash, 59 was killed in the same bombing.
142. Mohammed Isam al-Batash, 17 was killed in the same bombing.
143. Ahmad Naman al-Batash, 27 was killed in the same bombing.
144. Yahya Alaa al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
145. Jalal Majid al-Batash, 26 was killed in the same bombing.
146. Mahmoud Majid al-Batash, 22 was killed in the same bombing.
147. Marwa Majid al-Batash, 25 was killed in the same bombing.
148. Majid Subhi al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.
149. Khalid Majid al-Batash, 20 was killed in the same bombing.
150. Ibrahim Majid al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
151. Manar Majid al-Batash, 14 was killed in the same bombing.
152. Amal Hassan al-Batash, 49 was killed in the same bombing.
153. Anas Alaa al-Batash, 10 was killed in the same bombing.
154. Qassi Alaa al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.
Sunday, July 13:
155. Rami Abu Shanab, 25, succumbed to wounds sustained several days ago in Deir al-Balah.
156. Khawla al-Hawajri, 25, was killed in a bombing in Nusseirat.
157. Mohammed Ghazi Areef, 35, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
158. Ahmad Youssef Daloul, 47, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
159. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou, 80, succumbed to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.
160. Fawzia Abdel A�el, 73, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
161. Haitham Ashraf Zarb, 21, succumbed to wounds sustained during an attack on Rafah on Saturday that killed two other members of the Zarb family.
162. Leila Hassan al-Awdat, 41, was killed in an attack on Meghazi that wounded four others.
163. Hussam Ibrahim al-Najjar, 14, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza. His remains were taken to Beit Hanoun Hospital.
164. Rawidah Abu Harb al-Zwaida, 31, was killed.
165. Samer Tallal Hamdan was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
166. Hussein Abd al-Qadir Muheisen, 19, succumbed to wounds sustained in Gaza City.
167. Maher Thabit Abu Mar, 24, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
168. Mohammed Salim Abu Bureis, 65, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
169. Saddam Moussa Moamar, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
170. Mousa Shehade Moamar, 60, was killed in Khan Younis.
171. Hanadi Hamadi Moamar, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
172. Adham Mohammed Abed al-Fatah Abed al-Al was killed in Gaza.
Monday, July 14:
173. Qassem Tallal Hamdan, 23, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
174. Hamid Suleiman Abu al-Araj Deir al-Balah, 60.
175. Abdullah Mahmoud Barakah, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
176. Tamer Salem Kodeih, 37, was killed in Khan Younis.
177. Ziad Maher al-Najjar, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
178. Ziad Salem al-Shawi, 25, was killed in Rafah.
179. Mohammed Yasser Hamdan, 24, was killed in Gaza.
180. Mohammed Shakib al-Agha, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
181. Mohammed Younis Abu Youssif, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
182. Sara Omar Sheikh al-Eid, 4, was killed in Rafah.
183. Omar Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 24, was killed in Rafah.
184. Jihad Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 48, was killed in Rafah.
185. Kamal Ated Youssif Abu Taha, 16, was killed in Khan Younis.
186. Ismail Nabil Ahmad Abu Hatab, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
Tuesday, July 15:
187. Ahmad Younis Abu Youssif, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
188. Bushra Khalil Zoarob, 53, was killed in Rafah.
189. Atwa Amira al-Maamour, 63, was killed in Khan Younis.
190. Ismail Salim al-Najjar, 46, was killed in Khan Younis.
191. Mohammed Ahmad Ibrahim al-Najjar, 49, was killed in Khan Younis.
192. Suleiman Abu Louli, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
193. Sobhi Abdel Hamid Moussa, 77, was killed in Khan Younis.
194. Ismail Ftouh, 24, was killed in Gaza.
195. Saleh Said Dahliz Rafah, 20, was killed in Rafah.
196. Yasser Abdel Mahmoun, 18, was killed in Rafah.
197. Ibrahim Khalil al-Asaafi, 66, was killed in Jiher el-Deek.
198. Mohammed Abdullah al-Zahouk, 23, was killed in Rafah.
199. Mohammed Ismail Abu Awda, 27, was killed in Rafah.
Wednesday, July 16:
200. Mohammed Sabri al-Dibari, 20, was killed in Rafah.
201. Abdullah Mohammed Abdullah al-Irjani, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
202. Ahmad Adel Ahmad al-Niwajha, 23, was killed in Rafah.
203. Mohammed Tayseer Sharab, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
204. Farid Mohammed Abu Daqa, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
205. Ashraf Khalil Abu Shanab, 33, was killed in Rafah.
206. Khadra al-Abd Salama Abu Daqa, 65, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
207. Omar Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 24, was killed in the same attack.
208. Ibrahim Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 10, was killed in the same attack.
209. Abdel Rahman Ibrahim Khalil al-Sarkhi, 37, was killed in an attack on Gaza City.
210. Ahed Atef Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
211. Zakaria Ahed Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
212. Mohammed Ramez Bakr, 11, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
213. Ismail Mohammed Bakr, 9, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
214. Hamza Ra'ed Thari, 6, succumbed to wounds sustained "a few days ago" and passed away.
215. Mohammed Akram Abu Amer, 34, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
216. Kamal Mohammed Abu Amer, 38, Mohammed's brother, was reported seriously injured and then dead in the same attack.
217. Raqia al-Astal, 70, was killed in the bombing of a mosque in Khan Younis which killed at least three others and critically wounded several children.
218. Yasmin al-Astal, 4, was killed in the same attack.
219. Hussein Abdel Nasser al-Astal, 23, was killed in the same attack.
220. Usama Mahmoud al-Astal, 6, was critically wounded in the same attack and succumbed to his wounds shortly afterwards.
221. Hossam Shamlakh, 23, succumbed to wounds sustained in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.
222. Mohammed Kamal Abdel Rahman, 30, was killed in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.
Thursday, July 17:
223. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Qadim, 22, succumbed to wounds sustained in Deir al-Balah.
224. Zeinab Mohammed Saeed al-Abadleh, 70, died of her wounds in the Gaza European hospital.
225. Mohammed Abdel Rahman Hassouneh, 67, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
226. Mohammed Ahmad al-Hout, 41, was killed in the same attack while on his way to morning prayers.
227. Ahmad Rihan, 23, was killed in an attack on North Gaza.
228. Salam Salah Fayyad, 25, succumbed to his wounds in a hospital in Gaza's central province.
229. Abdallah al-Akhras, 27, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
230. Bashir Abd al-A'el, 20, was killed in the same attack.
231. Mohammed Ziyad Ghanem, 25, was killed in the same attack.
232. Fulla Tarek Shaheber, 8, was killed along with two child relatives in an airstrike on their home in Gaza City.
233. Jihad Issam Shaheber, 10, was killed in the same strike.
234. Wassim Issam Shaheber, 9, was killed in the same strike.
235. Yassin al-Humaideh, 4, died of wounds suffered in an earlier attack on Gaza City.
236. Rahaf Khalil al-Jabbour, 4, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
237. Hamza Houssam al-Abadaleh, 29, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
238. Abed Ali Natiz, 26, was killed in Gaza.
239. Mohammed Salem Natiz, 4, was killed in Gaza City.
240. Mohammed Shadi Natiz, 15, was killed in Gaza City.
241. Salah Salah al-Shafiai was killed in Khan Younis.
242. Majdi Suleiman Salamah Jabarah, 22, was killed in Rafah.
243. Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, 5 months old, was killed in Rafah.
Friday, July 18:
244. Nassim Mahmoud Nassir was killed in an attack on Beit Hanoun.
245. Karam Mahmoud Nassir was killed in the same attack.
246. Omar Ayyad al-Mahmoum, 18, from Rafah, was killed in an attack on al-Shawka.
247. Salmiah Suleiman Ghayyad, 70, was killed in an attack east of Rafah.
248. Rami Saqqer Abu Tawila was killed in an attack east of al-Shujayeh that wounded 7 of his family members.
249. Hamad Abu Lahyia, 23, was killed in an attack east of Qarara that critically wounded several others.
250. Bassem Mohammed Mahmoud Madi, 22, was killed in an attack east of Rafah that wounded 11 others.
251. Mohammed Abdel Fattah Rashad Fayyad, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
252. Mahmoud Mohammed Fayyad, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
253. Bilal Mahmoud Radwan, 23, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
254. Mundhir Radwan, 22, was killed in the same attack.
255. Ahmad Fawzia Radwan, 23, was killed in the same attack.
256. Mahmoud Fawzia Radwan, 24, was killed in the same attack.
257. Ismail Youssef Taha Qassim, 59, was killed in an attack in Beit Hanoun that wounded 25 others.
258. Amal Khadir Ibrahim Badour, 40, was killed in the same attack.
259. Hani As'ad Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis that killed his nephew and wounded 4 others.
260. Mohammed Hamdan Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in the same attack.
261. Hussam Muslim Abu Eissa, 26, was killed in Jahr al-Dik.
262. Walaa Abu Ismail Muslim,12, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
263. Mohammed Abu Muslim, 13, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
264. Ahmad Abu Muslim, 14, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
265. Ahmed Abdullah al-Bahnasawi, 25, was killed in the village of Om al-Nasr in Gaza.
266. Saleh Zaghidi, 20, was killed in Rafah.
267. Alaa Abu Shbat, 23, was killed in Rafah.
268. Ahmed Hasan Saleh al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in al-Fakhari.
269. Hamada Abdallah al-Bashiti, 21, was killed in al-Fakhari.
270. Abdullah Jamal al-Samiri, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
271. Mahmoud Ali Darwish, 40, was killed in Nusseirat.
272. Wila al-Qara, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
273. Raafat Mohammed al-Bahloul, 35, was killed in Khan Younis.
274. Mohammed Awad Matar, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
275. Hamza Mohammed Abu al-Hussein, 27, was killed in Rafah.
276. Imad Hamed Alouwein, 7, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
277. Qassem Hamed Alouwein, 4, was killed in the same strike.
278. Sara Mohammed Boustan, 13, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
279. Rizk Ahmed al-Hayek, 2, was killed in Gaza City.
280. Mohammed Saad Mahmoud Abu Saade, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
281. Naim Moussa Abu Jarad, 24, was killed in tank shelling on his home in Beit Hanoun along with seven members of his family.
282. Abed Moussa Abu Jarad, 30, was killed in the same attack.
283. Siham Moussa Abu Jarad, 15, was killed in the same attack.
284. Rijaa Alyan Abu Jarad, 31, was killed in the same attack.
285. Ahlam Naim Abu Jarad, 13, was killed in the same attack.
286. Hania Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 3, was killed in the same attack.
287. Samih Naim Abu Jarad, 1, was killed in the same attack.
288. Moussa Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 6, was killed in the same attack.
289. Moustafa Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in an air strike on Rafah along with two relatives.
290. Imad Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in the same attack.
291. Nizar Fayez Abu Sanina, 38, was killed in the same attack.
292. Ghassan Salem Moussa, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
293. Mohammed Salem Shaat, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
294. Ahmed Salem Shaat, 22, was killed in the same attack.
295. Amjad Salem Shaat, 15, was killed in the same attack.
296. Mohamed Talal al-Sanaa, 20, was killed in Rafah.
Saturday, July 19:
297. Ayad Ismail al-Rakib, 26, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
298. Yehya Bassam al-Sirri, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
299. Mohammed Bassam al-Sirri, 17, was killed in the same attack.
300. Mahmoud Redda Salhia, 56, was killed in Khan Younis.
301. Moustafa Redda Salhia, 21, was killed in the same attack.
302. Mohammed Moustafa Salhia, 22, was killed in the same attack.
303. Wissam Redda Salhia, 15, was killed in the same attack.
304. Ibrahim Jamal Kamal Nasser, 13, was killed in Khan Younis.
305. Ahmed Mahmoud Hassan Aziz, 34, Khan Younis.
306. Said Ola Issa, 30, was killed in the central disrict.
307. Mohammed Awad Fares Nassar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
308. Mohammed Jihad al-Kara, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
309. Rashdi Khaled Nassar, 24, was killed in the same Khan Younis.
310. Raed Walid Likan, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
311. Raafat Ali Bahloul, 36, was killed in Khan Younis.
312. Bilal Ismail Abu Daqqah, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
313. Mohammed Ismail Samour, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
314. Ismail Ramadan al-Lawalhi, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
315. Mohammed Ziad al-Rahhel, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
316. Mohammed Ahmed Abu Zaanounah, 36, was killed in Gaza.
317. Mohammed Rafic al-Rahhel, 22, was killed in Beit Lahia.
318. Fadel Mohammed al-Banna, 29. was killed in Jbalia.
319. Mohammed Atallah Awdeh Saadat, 25, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
320. Mohammed Abedel Rahman Abu Hamad, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
321. Maali Abedel Rahman Suleiman Abu Zayed, 24, al-Wista.
322. Mahmoud Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 23, was killed in Beit Lahia.
323. Dalia Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
324. Ruaia Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
325. Nagham Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 2, was killed in Beit Lahia.
326. Amer Hamoudah, 7, was killed in Beit Lahia.
327. Mahmoud Rizk Mohammed Hamoudah, 18, was killed in Beit Lahia.
328. Mohammed Khaled Jamil al-Zuweidi, 20, was killed in Beit Lahia.
329. Mohammed Ahmad al-Saidi, 18, was killed in Khan Younis.
330. Abdel Rahman Mohammed Awdah Barak, 23, al-Wista.
331. Tarek Samir Khalil al-Hitto, 26, was killed in al-Wista.
332. Mahmoud al-Sharif, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
333. Mohammed Fathi al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
334. Mahmoud Anwar Abu Shabab, 16, was killed in Rafah.
335. Mo'men Taysir al-Abed Abu Dan, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
336. Abdel Aziz Samir Abu Zeiter, 31, was killed in al-Wista.
337. Mohammed Ziad Zaabout, 24, was killed in Gaza.
338. Hatem Ziadah Zaabout, 22, was killed in Gaza.
339. Ahmad Maher Mohammed Abu Thuria, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
340. Abdullah Ghazi Abdullah al-Masri, 30, was killed in al-Wista.
341. Ayman Hisham al-Naaouq, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
342. Akram Mahmoud al-Matwouk, 37, was killed in Jabalia.
343. Salem Ali Abu Saadah was killed in Khan Younis.
Sunday, July 20:
344. Hosni Mahmoud al-Absi, 56, was killed in Rafah.
345. Mohammed Mahmoud Moamar, 30, was killed in Rafah,
346. Hamza Mahmoud Moamar, 21, was killed in Rafah.
347. Anas Mahmoud Moamar, 17, was killed in rafah.
348. Mohammed Ali Jundieh, 38, was killed in Gaza.
349. Mohammed Khalil al-Hayyah
350. Osama Khalil al-Hayyah
351. Khalil Osama al-Hayyah
352. Hala Saqer Abu Hin
353. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Wista.
354. Ahmad Tawfiq Zannoun, 26, was killed in Rafah.
355. Sohaib Ali Jomaa Abu Qoura, 21, was killed in Rafah.
356. Homeid Sobh Mohammed Abu Foujo, 22, was killed in Rafah.
357. Toufic Marshoud, 52, was killed in Gaza.
358. Ibrahim Khalil Abd Ammar, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
359. Ibrahim Salim Joumea al-Sahbani, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
360. Ibrahim Arrif Ibrahim al-Ghalayini, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
361. Osama Khalil Ismail al-Hayya, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
362. Osama Roubhi Shahta Ayyad, 31, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
363. Isra Yassir Atieh Hamidieh, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
364. Akram Mohammed Ali al-Skafi, 63, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
365. Iman Khalil Abed Ammar, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
366. Iman Mohammed Ibrahim Hamadeh, 40, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
367. Ahmad Ishaq Youssef al-Ramlawi, 33, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
368. Ahmad Sammi Diab Ayyad, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
369. Ahmad Mohammed Ahmad Abu Zanouna, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
370. Imama Isama Khalil al-Hayya, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
371. Talla Akram Ahmad al-Atwi, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
372. Tawfiq Ibrawi Salem Marshoud, 52, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
373. Hatim Ziad Ali al-Zabout, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
374. Khalid Riyad Mohammed Hamad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
375. Khadija Ali Moussa Shahadi, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
376. Khalil Osama Khalil al-Hayya, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
377. Khalil Salim Ibrahim Mousbah, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
378. Dima Adil Abdullah Aslim, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
379. Dina Rushdi Omar Hamadi, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
380. Rahaf Akram Ismail Abu Joumea, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
381. Saji Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
382. Samia Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 3, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
383. Soad Mohammed Abdel Razik al-Hallaq, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
384. Samar Osama Khalil al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
385. Shadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
386. Shireen Fathi Othman Ayyad, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
387. Adil Abdullah Salim Aslim, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
388. Assem Khalil Abed Ammar, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
389. Ahed Saed Moussa al-Sirsik, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
390. Ayisha Ali Mahmoud Zayid, 54, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
391. Abdel Rahman Akram Mohammed al-Skafi, 22, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
392. Abdel Rahman Abdel Razak Abdel Rahman al-Shaykh Khalil, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
393. Abdullah Mansour Radwan Ammara, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
394. Abed Rabboh Ahmad Mohammed Zayid, 58, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
395. Isam Atieh Said al-Skafi, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
396. Ola Ziad Hassan Aslim, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
397. Alaa Jamal al-Din Mohammed Bourda, 35, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
398. Ali Mohammed Hassan al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
399. Omar Jamil Soubhi Hammouda, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
400. Ghada Soubhi Sa'adi Ayyad, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
401. Ghada Ibrahim Suleiman Udwan, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
402. Fadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
403. Fatima Abdel Rahim Abdel Qadir Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
404. Fida'a Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
405. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Sa'ed Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
406. Qinan Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
407. Maysa Abdel Rahman Said al-Sirsawi, 37, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
408. Mohammed Ashraf Rafiq Ayyad, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
409. Mohammed Hassan Mohammad al-Skafi, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
410. Mohammed Rami Fathi Ayyad, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
411. Mohammed Ra'ed Ihsan Aqqila, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
412. Mohammed Ziad Ali al-Zabbout, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
413. Mohammed Mohammed Ali Muharrib Jundiyah, 38, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
414. Mohammed Hani Mohammad al-Halaq, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
415. Marrah Shakil Ahmad al-Jammal, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
416. Marwan Mounir Saleh Qunfud, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
417. Marwa Salman Ahmad al-Sirsawi, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
418. Moussaeb al-Khayr Salah al-Din Said al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
419. Mona Suleiman Ahmad al-Sheikh Khalil, 49, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
420. Mona Abdel Rahman Mahmoud Ayyad, 42, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
421. Nirmin Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
422. Hala Akram Hassan al-Hallaq, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
423. Hala Soubhi Saidi Ayyad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
424. Hala Saqr Hassan al-Hayya, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
425. Hani Mohammed Ahmad al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
426. Hiba Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
427. Youssef Ahmad Younis Mustafa, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
428. Youssef Salim Hamto Habib, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
429. Unknown
430. Mohammed Ayman al-Shaer, 5, was killed in Khan Younis.
431. Leila Hasan al-Shaer, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
432. Salah Saleh al-Shaer, in his forties, was killed in Khan Younis.
433. Hibatullah Akram al-Shaer, 7, was killed in Khan Younis.
434. Youssef Sha'aban Ziyadeh, 44, was killed in al-Barij.
435. Jamil Sha'aban Ziyadeh, 53, was killed in the same attack.
436. Sha'aban Jamil Ziyadeh, 12, was killed in the same attack.
437. Omar Sha'aban Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
438. Muftiya Mohammed Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
439. Bayyan Abdel Latif Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
440. Ismail al-Qurdi
441. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Muqadama, 30, was killed in the same attack.
442. Najah Sa'ad al-Din Daraji, 65, was killed in Rafah.
443. Abdullah Youssef Daraji, 3, was killed in the same attack.
444. Mohammed Baghdar al-Dughma, 20, was killed in Beni Soheileh.
445. Mohammed Raja' Mohammed Handam, 15, was killed in Rafah.
446. Aya Bahjat Abu Sultan, 15, was killed in Beit Lahya.
447. Hani Mohammed al-Halaq, 29, was killed in al-Ramal.
448. Suad Mohammed al-Halaq, 62, was killed in the same attack.
449. Qinan Akram al-Halaq, 5, was killed in the same attack.
450. Samar Osama al-Halaq, 29, was killed in the same attack.
451. Saji al-Halaq was killed in the same attack.
452. Ibrahim Khalil Ammar was killed in the same attack.
453. Ahmad Yassin was killed in the same attack.
454. Rayan Taysir Abu Jamea, 8, was killed in Khan Younis.
455. Fatima Mahmoud Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
456. Sabah Tawfiq Mahmoud Abu Jamea, 38, was killed in the same attack.
457. Rozan Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 14, was killed in the same attack. Her body was recovered from the rubble on Monday.
458. Jawdat al-Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
459. Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 5, was killed in the same attack.
460. Haifa Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 9, was killed in the same attack.
461. Yasmin Ahmad Salama Abu Jamea, 25, was killed in the same attack.
462. Suheila Bassam Ahmad Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
463. Shahinaz Walid Ahmad Abu Jamea, 1, was killed in the same attack.
464. Hossam Hossam Abu Qaynas, 5, was killed in the same attack.
465. An unidentified woman was killed in the same attack.
466. An unidentified woman in her 30s was killed in the same attack.
467. An unidentified child was killed in the same attack.
468. Ahmad Suleiman Mahmoud Sahmoud, 34, was killed in the same attack.
469. Minwa Abdel Bassit Ahmad al-Sabea, 37, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
470. Mahmoud Moussa Abu Anzar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
471. Turkiyah al-Abed al-Biss
472. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
473. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
474. Abdullah Omar al-Maghribi was killed in Rafah.
475. Najah al-Maghribi was killed in the same attack.
476. Bassem al-Brayim was killed in Khan Younis.
477. Ra'ed Mansour Nayfeh was killed in Gaza City.
478. Fuad Jaber was killed in Gaza City.
479. Mohammed Mahmoud Hussein Moammar was killed in Rafah.
480. Hamza Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
481. Anas Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
482. Bilal Jaber Mohammed al-Ashhab, 22, was killed in al-Mughraqa.
483. An unidentified body was recovered along with Bilal.
484. Ra'ed Ismail al-Bardawil, 26, was killed in Rafah.
485. Unknown
486. Unknown
487. Unknown
488. Unknown
489. Unknown
490. Unknown
491. Unknown
492. Unknown
Monday, July 21:
493. Sumoud Nasr Siyam, 26, was killed in Rafah.
494. Mohammed Mahrous Salam Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
495. Badr Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
496. Ahmad Ayman Mahrous Siyam, 17, was killed in the same attack.
497. Mustafa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 12, was killed in the same attack.
498. Ghaydaa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
499. Shireen Mohammed Salam Siyam, 32, was killed in the same attack.
500. Dalal Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
501. Kamal Mahrous Salama Siyam, 27, was killed in the same attack.
502. Abdullah Trad Abu Hjeir, 16, was killed in Nusseirat.
503. Ahmad Moussa Shaykh al-Eid, 23, was killed in Rafah.
504. Zakariah Massoud al-Ashqar, 24, was killed in Gaza City.
505. Kamal Talal Hassan al-Masri, 22, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
506. Ra'ed Isam Daoud, 30, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
507. Fatima Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
508. Ahmad Mohammed Azzam, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
509. Mahmoud Hassan al-Nakhala was killed in Gaza.
510. Kamal Massoud, 21, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
511. Saleh Badawi, 31, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
512. Unidentified body in the Gaza European hospital.
513. Majdi Mahmoud al-Yazaji, 56, was killed in Gaza City.
514. Mohammed Samih al-Ghalban was killed in Gaza City.
515. Karam Ibrahim Atieh Barham, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
516. Nidal Ali Abu Daqqa, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
517. Nidal Joumea Abu Assi, 43, was killed in Khan Younis.
518. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
519. Mayar al-Yazaji, 2, was killed in al-Karama.
520. Yasmin al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
521. Wajdi al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
522. Safinaz al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
523. Unidentified child, 5, was killed in the same attack.
524. Mahran Kamel Jondeyah, 32, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
525. Tamer Nayef Jondeyah, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
526. Rahma Ahmad Jondeyah, 50, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
527. Ibrahim Shaaban Bakroun, 37, was killed in al-Shaaf
528. An unidentified person was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital. The attack killed three others and wounded 50.
529. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
530. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
531. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
532. Youssef Ghazi Hamidieh, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
533. Moataz Jamal Hamidieh, 18, was killed in the same attack.
534. Aed Jamal Hamidieh, 21, was killed in the same attack.
535. Aya Yasser al-Qassas was killed in Gaza City.
536. Aesha Yasser al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
537. Nasma Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
538. Lamyaa Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
539. Israa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
540. Yasmin al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
541. Arwa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
542. Aliaa al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
543. Fayza al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
544. Soumaya al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
545. Fatima Ahmad al-Arja was killed in Rafah.
546. Atieh Youssef Dardouna, 26, was killed in Jabalia.
547. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
548. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
549. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
550. Fadi Azmi Brayaem was killed in Deir al-Balah.
551. Othman Salem Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
552. Salem Abdel Majeed Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
553. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
554. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
555. Ibrahim Dib Ahmad al-Kilani, 53, was killed in a strike on Israa tower in Gaza City along with his wife and their five children. Four members of his wife�s family were also killed in the attack.
556. Taghrid Shaaban Mohammed al-Kilani, 45, was killed in the same attack.
557. Yaser Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 8, was killed in the same attack.
558. Elias Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 4, was killed in the same attack.
559. Sawsan Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 11, was killed in the same attack.
560. Rim Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 12, was killed in the same attack.
561. Yaseen Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 9, was killed in the same attack.
562. Mahmoud Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 37, was killed in the same attack.
563. Aida Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 47, was killed in the same attack.
564. Soura Shaaban mohammed Derbas, 41, was killed in the same attack.
565. Inas Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 30, was killed in the same attack.
566. Jihad Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
567. Fadi Bashir al-Abadleh, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
568. Unknown
569. Unknown
570. Unknown


As recieved from Trevor Hoyle, Rochdale.